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Frequencies contributing to functional connectivity in the cerebral cortex in "resting-state" data.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, August 2001
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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1039 Dimensions

Readers on

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713 Mendeley
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8 CiteULike
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Title
Frequencies contributing to functional connectivity in the cerebral cortex in "resting-state" data.
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, August 2001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dietmar Cordes, Victor M. Haughton, Konstantinos Arfanakis, John D. Carew, Patrick A. Turski, Chad H. Moritz, Michelle A. Quigley, M. Elizabeth Meyerand, Cordes, D, Haughton, V M, Arfanakis, K, Carew, J D, Turski, P A, Moritz, C H, Quigley, M A, Meyerand, M E

Abstract

In subjects performing no specific cognitive task ("resting state"), time courses of voxels within functionally connected regions of the brain have high cross-correlation coefficients ("functional connectivity"). The purpose of this study was to measure the contributions of low frequencies and physiological noise to cross-correlation maps. In four healthy volunteers, task-activation functional MR imaging and resting-state data were acquired. We obtained four contiguous slice locations in the "resting state" with a high sampling rate. Regions of interest consisting of four contiguous voxels were selected. The correlation coefficient for the averaged time course and every other voxel in the four slices was calculated and separated into its component frequency contributions. We calculated the relative amounts of the spectrum that were in the low-frequency (0 to 0.1 Hz), the respiratory-frequency (0.1 to 0.5 Hz), and cardiac-frequency range (0.6 to 1.2 Hz). For each volunteer, resting-state maps that resembled task-activation maps were obtained. For the auditory and visual cortices, the correlation coefficient depended almost exclusively on low frequencies (<0.1 Hz). For all cortical regions studied, low-frequency fluctuations contributed more than 90% of the correlation coefficient. Physiological (respiratory and cardiac) noise sources contributed less than 10% to any functional connectivity MR imaging map. In blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid, physiological noise contributed more to the correlation coefficient. Functional connectivity in the auditory, visual, and sensorimotor cortices is characterized predominantly by frequencies slower than those in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. In functionally connected regions, these low frequencies are characterized by a high degree of temporal coherence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 713 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 24 3%
United Kingdom 12 2%
Germany 6 <1%
Netherlands 4 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Ireland 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Other 10 1%
Unknown 645 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 177 25%
Researcher 168 24%
Student > Master 104 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 59 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 39 5%
Other 109 15%
Unknown 57 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 125 18%
Psychology 123 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 108 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 101 14%
Engineering 64 9%
Other 90 13%
Unknown 102 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2020.
All research outputs
#4,725,914
of 16,000,600 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1,323
of 3,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,243
of 280,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#52
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,000,600 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.