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The original colours of fossil beetles

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
103 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
The original colours of fossil beetles
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2011
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2011.1677
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria E. McNamara, Derek E. G. Briggs, Patrick J. Orr, Heeso Noh, Hui Cao

Abstract

Structural colours, the most intense, reflective and pure colours in nature, are generated when light is scattered by complex nanostructures. Metallic structural colours are widespread among modern insects and can be preserved in their fossil counterparts, but it is unclear whether the colours have been altered during fossilization, and whether the absence of colours is always real. To resolve these issues, we investigated fossil beetles from five Cenozoic biotas. Metallic colours in these specimens are generated by an epicuticular multi-layer reflector; the fidelity of its preservation correlates with that of other key cuticular ultrastructures. Where these other ultrastructures are well preserved in non-metallic fossil specimens, we can infer that the original cuticle lacked a multi-layer reflector; its absence in the fossil is not a preservational artefact. Reconstructions of the original colours of the fossils based on the structure of the multi-layer reflector show that the preserved colours are offset systematically to longer wavelengths; this probably reflects alteration of the refractive index of the epicuticle during fossilization. These findings will allow the former presence, and original hue, of metallic structural colours to be identified in diverse fossil insects, thus providing critical evidence of the evolution of structural colour in this group.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 103 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 5%
United Kingdom 5 5%
South Africa 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Unknown 84 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 25%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 10 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 28%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 18%
Physics and Astronomy 17 18%
Engineering 8 8%
Materials Science 5 5%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 137. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2021.
All research outputs
#193,191
of 19,171,602 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#529
of 9,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#763
of 114,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,171,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,107 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 114,612 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.