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Determinants of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Surgery, August 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
81 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis
Published in
Annals of Surgery, August 2019
DOI 10.1097/sla.0000000000002766
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanna Sternby, Federico Bolado, Héctor J. Canaval-Zuleta, Carlos Marra-López, Ana I. Hernando-Alonso, Adolfo del-Val-Antoñana, Guillermo García-Rayado, Robin Rivera-Irigoin, Francisco J. Grau-García, Lluís Oms, Judith Millastre-Bocos, Isabel Pascual-Moreno, David Martínez-Ares, Juan A. Rodríguez-Oballe, Antonio López-Serrano, María L. Ruiz-Rebollo, Alejandro Viejo-Almanzor, Belén González-de-la-Higuera, Aitor Orive-Calzada, Ignacio Gómez-Anta, José Pamies-Guilabert, Fátima Fernández-Gutiérrez-del-Álamo, Isabel Iranzo-González-Cruz, Mónica E. Pérez-Muñante, María D. Esteba, Ana Pardillos-Tomé, Pedro Zapater, Enrique de-Madaria

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare and validate the different classifications of severity in acute pancreatitis (AP) and to investigate which characteristics of the disease are associated with worse outcomes. AP is a heterogeneous disease, ranging from uneventful cases to patients with considerable morbidity and high mortality rates. Severity classifications based on legitimate determinants of severity are important to correctly describe the course of disease. A prospective multicenter cohort study involving patients with AP from 23 hospitals in Spain. The Atlanta Classification (AC), Revised Atlanta Classification (RAC), and Determinant-based Classification (DBC) were compared. Binary logistic multivariate analysis was performed to investigate independent determinants of severity. A total of 1655 patients were included; 70 patients (4.2%) died. RAC and DBC were equally superior to AC for describing the clinical course of AP. Although any kind of organ failure was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, persistent organ failure (POF) was the most significant determinant of severity. All local complications were associated with worse outcomes. Infected pancreatic necrosis correlated with high morbidity, but in the presence of POF, it was not associated to higher mortality when compared with sterile necrotizing pancreatitis. Exacerbation of previous comorbidity was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The RAC and DBC both signify an advance in the description and differentiation of AP patients. Herein, we describe the complications of the disease independently associated to morbidity and mortality. Our findings are valuable not only when designing future studies on AP but also for the improvement of current classifications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 81 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 17%
Other 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Master 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2020.
All research outputs
#308,606
of 15,381,025 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Surgery
#208
of 6,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,236
of 278,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Surgery
#9
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,381,025 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,590 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,286 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.