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Invaders in hot water: a simple decontamination method to prevent the accidental spread of aquatic invasive non-native species

Overview of attention for article published in Biological Invasions, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
36 X users
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
Title
Invaders in hot water: a simple decontamination method to prevent the accidental spread of aquatic invasive non-native species
Published in
Biological Invasions, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10530-015-0875-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy G. Anderson, Alison M. Dunn, Paula J. Rosewarne, Paul D. Stebbing

Abstract

Watersports equipment can act as a vector for the introduction and spread of invasive non native species (INNS) in freshwater environments. To support advice given to recreational water users under the UK Government's Check Clean Dry biosecurity campaign and ensure its effectiveness at killing a range of aquatic INNS, we conducted a survival experiment on seven INNS which pose a high risk to UK freshwaters. The efficacy of exposure to hot water (45 °C, 15 min) was tested as a method by which waters users could 'clean' their equipment and was compared to drying and a control group (no treatment). Hot water had caused 99 % mortality across all species 1 h after treatment and was more effective than drying at all time points (1 h: χ(2) = 117.24, p < 0.001; 1 day χ(2) = 95.68, p < 0.001; 8 days χ(2) = 12.16, p < 0.001 and 16 days χ(2) = 7.58, p < 0.001). Drying caused significantly higher mortality than the control (no action) from day 4 (χ(2) = 8.49, p < 0.01) onwards. In the absence of hot water or drying, 6/7 of these species survived for 16 days, highlighting the importance of good biosecurity practice to reduce the risk of accidental spread. In an additional experiment the minimum lethal temperature and exposure time in hot water to cause 100 % mortality in American signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), was determined to be 5 min at 40 °C. Hot water provides a simple, rapid and effective method to clean equipment. We recommend that it is advocated in future biosecurity awareness campaigns.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 122 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 22%
Researcher 18 15%
Student > Master 13 11%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Other 11 9%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 27 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 37%
Environmental Science 36 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 <1%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 29 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2016.
All research outputs
#883,454
of 25,937,538 outputs
Outputs from Biological Invasions
#107
of 2,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,716
of 278,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biological Invasions
#1
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,937,538 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.