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Cancer incidence in Germany attributable to human papillomavirus in 2013

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, October 2017
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Title
Cancer incidence in Germany attributable to human papillomavirus in 2013
Published in
BMC Cancer, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3678-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nina Buttmann-Schweiger, Yvonne Deleré, Stefanie J. Klug, Klaus Kraywinkel

Abstract

It is estimated that a total of 120,000 new cancer cases in men and in women in more developed countries could be avoided if exposure to HPV was prevented. We used the nationwide pool of German population-based cancer registry data to estimate the burden of HPV-attributable cancer in this population for the year 2013. Incident cases of cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the anus, oropharynx (OP), as well as of the vulva, vagina and penis were classified as potentially HPV-associated and identified from the nationwide cancer registry data-pool. We calculated the incidence and proportions of cancer with potentially HPV-associated morphologies. Estimation of the HPV-attributable incidence was based on prevalence-estimates of viral DNA in tumor cells in the respective sites, as provided from the international literature. From the overall 15,936 incident cases of anogenital and OP cancers in 2013, 6239 female and 1358 male cancer cases were estimated to be attributable to HPV. The majority of HPV-attributable cases were contributed by cervical cancer (70.9% of female cancers) and oropharyngeal cancer (46.9% of male cancers). Even if most HPV-attributable cases were contributed by cervical cancer, anogenital cancer at sites other than the cervix, and oropharyngeal cancer substantially contribute to the burden of HPV-associated cancer. Our nationwide cancer registry data-analyses provide the baseline for long-term population-based monitoring of vaccination-effects on cancer incidence in Germany.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 20%
Unspecified 3 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Professor 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 45%
Unspecified 6 30%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,406,466
of 12,829,119 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,878
of 4,753 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,671
of 269,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
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