↓ Skip to main content

Noise exposure and hypertension: investigation of a silent relationship

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Noise exposure and hypertension: investigation of a silent relationship
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1671-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatiana Cristina Fernandes de Souza, André Reynaldo Santos Périssé, Marisa Moura

Abstract

Noise is an important occupational hazard worldwide and hypertension a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is currently the greatest cause of disability retirement worldwide. The association between noise exposure and auditory effects is well documented in the biomedical literature, but the same is not true about exposure to different levels of noise and extra-auditory effects. It has been shown that noise exposure levels to be considered for non-auditory effects may not be the same as in the case of auditory effects. The frequent presence of noise in workplace environments, the high prevalence of hypertension worldwide, the biological plausibility of the association between noise exposure and high blood pressure and the need for more studies investigating the non-auditory effects of exposures to less than 85 dB(A), were the reasons that led us to develop this study. We aimed at investigating the hypothesis that exposure to different levels of noise is associated with hypertension. We used a cross-sectional design to study the association between occupational noise exposure (≤75, 75-85, and ≥ 85 dB(A)) and hypertension (use of anti-hypertensive medication and/or blood pressure of ≥140/90 mmHg) in 1,729 petrochemical workers at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected from obligatory annual health evaluation records and from environmental measurements of noise and heat levels. We used logistical regression analysis to study the association while controlling for key confounding variables, such as smoking and body mass index. Using the ≤75 dB(A) as reference category, noise exposure was independently associated to hypertension both at the 75-85 dB(A) (OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.13-2.17) and the ≥85 dB(A) levels (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.10-2.26). Age, gender and body mass index were also independently associated to high blood pressure. Herein, we were able to demonstrate that noise exposure is independently associated to hypertension. Our results are consistent with other studies that used similar methodology and enabled us to verify the occurrence of non-auditory effects in workers exposed to noise levels considered safe for auditory effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Student > Master 6 18%
Researcher 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 10 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Environmental Science 5 15%
Engineering 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 15 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,014,710
of 13,138,880 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,164
of 9,024 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,899
of 221,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,138,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,024 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them