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Predictors and moderators of psychological changes during the treatment of adolescent bulimia nervosa.

Overview of attention for article published in Behaviour Research & Therapy, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors and moderators of psychological changes during the treatment of adolescent bulimia nervosa.
Published in
Behaviour Research & Therapy, April 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2015.04.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ciao, Anna C, Accurso, Erin C, Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E, Le Grange, Daniel

Abstract

This study examined predictors of psychological change among 80 adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) participating in a randomized-controlled trial comparing family-based treatment (FBT) to supportive psychotherapy (SPT). Psychological outcomes (cognitive eating disorder pathology, depression, and self-esteem) were explored at baseline, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up. Multi-level growth models examined predictors of rate of change in psychological outcomes and moderators of treatment effects. All psychological outcomes improved through 6-month follow-up (moderate to large effect sizes) across both treatments. Overall, few significant predictors were identified. Older adolescents had faster change in self-esteem relative to younger adolescents (p = 0.03). Adolescents taking psychotropic medication at baseline had faster change in eating concerns relative to adolescents not taking medication (p = 0.02). Age (p = 0.02) and baseline purging severity (p = 0.03) moderated the relationship between treatment condition and change in eating concerns, where younger adolescents and individuals with high baseline purging had greater change when treated with FBT relative to SPT. Age and purging did not significantly moderate change in other psychological outcomes. Bulimic symptom improvement did not predict change in psychological symptoms. Generally, FBT and SPT were equally efficacious with respect to psychological improvement, although FBT may be more efficacious in younger adolescents and those with more frequent purging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 26%
Student > Master 8 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 18%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 65%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,237,007
of 7,847,304 outputs
Outputs from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#979
of 1,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,532
of 197,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#17
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,847,304 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,409 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.