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Patterns of physical activity and sedentary behavior in a representative sample of a multi-ethnic South-East Asian population: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
151 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Patterns of physical activity and sedentary behavior in a representative sample of a multi-ethnic South-East Asian population: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1668-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aye Mya Win, Lim Wei Yen, Kristin HX Tan, Raymond Boon Tar Lim, Kee Seng Chia, Falk Mueller-Riemenschneider

Abstract

Few studies have investigated patterns of physical activity in a multi-ethnic Asian urban population. Even less is known about sedentary behaviors in these populations. The present study examined the prevalence of physical activity, exercise and sedentary behavior. In addition, it investigated socio-demographic correlates and the contribution of different domains towards overall physical activity. Data of 2319 participants from the population-based cross-sectional Singapore Health 2012 study were analyzed. Physical activity, exercise and sedentary behavior were assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaires. A modified Cox regression model was used to estimate the relative prevalence rates (PR) for overall physical activity, leisure-time exercise and high level of sedentary behavior by socio-demographic factors. Overall, 73.8% of participants met physical activity guidelines, 24.3% did regular leisure-time exercise and 37.0% reported high levels of sedentary behavior. Travel-related activities contributed about half of the total physical activity. There was a consistent association between age of participants with physical activity and exercise. Older participants were less likely to meet the guidelines (PR = 0.74, 95% C I = 0.61 - 0.91) than younger participants. The prevalence of regular exercise was lowest among 30 to 39 years aged participants (PR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.45 - 0.86). Females exercised less regularly (PR = 0.63, 95% C I = 0.51 - 0.76) than males. Participants with higher education exercised regularly (PR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.45 - 2.99) than participants with lower education. Employment status was consistently associated with exercise and high levels of sedentary behavior. Participants who were not in full-time employment exercised more regularly (PR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.1 - 1.92) and were less likely to report high levels of sedentary behavior (PR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.44 - 0.97) than those in full-time employment. Our population-based study suggests a need to encourage overall physical activity but, particularly regular leisure-time exercise, especially among middle-aged, females and those with lower levels of education and full-time employment. Strategies targeting workplaces may be important to reduce high levels of sedentary behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 151 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 148 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 46 30%
Student > Master 20 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 11%
Researcher 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 23 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 18%
Sports and Recreations 19 13%
Social Sciences 13 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 6%
Other 23 15%
Unknown 29 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2019.
All research outputs
#8,369,716
of 15,643,244 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,489
of 10,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,090
of 227,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,643,244 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,766 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,916 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them