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Personal financial incentives for changing habitual health-related behaviors: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Preventive Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
99 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
197 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Personal financial incentives for changing habitual health-related behaviors: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Preventive Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.03.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eleni Mantzari, Florian Vogt, Ian Shemilt, Yinghui Wei, Julian P.T. Higgins, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Uncertainty remains about whether personal financial incentives could achieve sustained changes in health-related behaviours that would reduce the fast-growing global non-communicable disease burden. This review aims to estimate whether: i. financial incentives achieve sustained changes in smoking, eating, alcohol consumption and physical activity; ii. effectiveness is modified by (a) the target behaviour, (b) incentive value and attainment certainty, (c) recipients' deprivation level. Multiple sources were searched for trials offering adults financial incentives and assessing outcomes relating to pre-specified behaviours at a minimum of six months from baseline. Analyses included random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions grouped by timed endpoints. Of 24,265 unique identified articles, 34 were included in the analysis. Financial incentives increased behaviour-change, with effects sustained until 18months from baseline (OR: 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.23) and three months post-incentive removal (OR: 2.11, 95% CI 1.21-3.67). High deprivation increased incentive effects (OR: 2.17; 95% CI 1.22-3.85), but only at >6-12months from baseline. Other assessed variables did not independently modify effects at any time-point. Personal financial incentives can change habitual health-related behaviours and help reduce health inequalities. However, their role in reducing disease burden is potentially limited given current evidence that effects dissipate beyond three months post-incentive removal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 99 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 197 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
France 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 187 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 47 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 18%
Student > Master 35 18%
Student > Bachelor 21 11%
Unspecified 18 9%
Other 41 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 20%
Social Sciences 34 17%
Unspecified 34 17%
Psychology 33 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 12 6%
Other 45 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 117. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#136,460
of 13,727,342 outputs
Outputs from Preventive Medicine
#71
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,990
of 224,490 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Preventive Medicine
#2
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,727,342 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,490 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.