Sexist Games=Sexist Gamers? A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship Between Video Game Use and Sexist Attitudes

Overview of attention for article published in CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 680)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
2013 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
8 Google+ users
reddit
7 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Sexist Games=Sexist Gamers? A Longitudinal Study on the Relationship Between Video Game Use and Sexist Attitudes
Published in
CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, April 2015
DOI 10.1089/cyber.2014.0492
Pubmed ID
Authors

BreuerJohannes, Breuer, Johannes, Kowert, Rachel, Festl, Ruth, Quandt, Thorsten

Abstract

From the oversexualized characters in fighting games, such as Dead or Alive or Ninja Gaiden, to the overuse of the damsel in distress trope in popular titles, such as the Super Mario series, the under- and misrepresentation of females in video games has been well documented in several content analyses. Cultivation theory suggests that long-term exposure to media content can affect perceptions of social realities in a way that they become more similar to the representations in the media and, in turn, impact one's beliefs and attitudes. Previous studies on video games and cultivation have often been cross-sectional or experimental, and the limited longitudinal work in this area has only considered time intervals of up to 1 month. Additionally, previous work in this area has focused on the effects of violent content and relied on self-selected or convenience samples composed mostly of adolescents or college students. Enlisting a 3 year longitudinal design, the present study assessed the relationship between video game use and sexist attitudes, using data from a representative sample of German players aged 14 and older (N=824). Controlling for age and education, it was found that sexist attitudes-measured with a brief scale assessing beliefs about gender roles in society-were not related to the amount of daily video game use or preference for specific genres for both female and male players. Implications for research on sexism in video games and cultivation effects of video games in general are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,013 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Germany 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
Unknown 61 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 20%
Other 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 27 39%
Social Sciences 15 22%
Linguistics 9 13%
Computer Science 6 9%
Engineering 4 6%
Other 8 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1514. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2017.
All research outputs
#505
of 7,438,156 outputs
Outputs from CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking
#1
of 680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25
of 197,522 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CyberPsychology, Behavior & Social Networking
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,438,156 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 680 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,522 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.