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Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in End-Stage Kidney Disease: Not Strictly Posterior or Reversible

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Nephrology, April 2015
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Title
Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in End-Stage Kidney Disease: Not Strictly Posterior or Reversible
Published in
American Journal of Nephrology, April 2015
DOI 10.1159/000381316
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark Canney, Dearbhla Kelly, Michael Clarkson

Abstract

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an uncommon clinico-radiological condition that can result in severe brain injury. The pathogenesis of cerebral vasogenic edema, the hallmark of PRES, is not fully understood. Despite its name, there is substantial heterogeneity both in terms of imaging findings and outcome. Relatively little is known about PRES in kidney disease despite the clustering of risk factors including hypertension, autoimmune disease and immunosuppression. In a retrospective observational study of incident end-stage kidney disease patients in Southwest Ireland over a ten year period, we discovered five cases of PRES representing an incidence of 0.84% in this patient population. These five cases highlight the variability in clinical presentation and the potentially life-threatening nature of this condition. We provide an in-depth review of the existing literature regarding PRES in terms of its pathogenesis and heterogeneity, as well as the experience of PRES in ESKD patients. PRES appears to be rare in the ESKD population but could be under-recognized. Marked hypertension is a cardinal risk factor in this population, associated with extracellular fluid volume expansion. Neuroimaging findings can be diverse involving both anterior and posterior circulation territories. Three of the five patients described had commenced haemodialysis within four weeks of their presentation. These patients may be particularly vulnerable to microvascular brain injury, which can be devastating. This emphasises the need for clinicians to pay meticulous attention to extracellular fluid volume control during this potentially hazardous period. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 8 24%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 67%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2015.
All research outputs
#10,735,376
of 12,106,553 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Nephrology
#825
of 889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,759
of 218,286 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Nephrology
#11
of 16 outputs
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