↓ Skip to main content

Point-of-care ultrasound of the diaphragm in a liver transplant patient with acute respiratory failure

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Ultrasound Journal, March 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Point-of-care ultrasound of the diaphragm in a liver transplant patient with acute respiratory failure
Published in
Critical Ultrasound Journal, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13089-015-0021-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Federico Barbariol, Luigi Vetrugno, Livia Pompei, Adelisa De Flaviis, Giorgio Della Rocca

Abstract

In some intensive care, nowadays, ultrasound diagnostics have become an extension of the physical examination (like a stethoscope). In this report, we discuss the case of an acute respiratory failure which arose immediately after the end of general anesthesia. An initial bedside ultrasound evaluation applying the 'BLUE protocol' showed no pathological changes capable of explaining the clinical picture; however, by evaluating also the right and left hemidiaphragms, we made a diagnosis of diaphragmatic dysfunction, which would probably have been difficult to diagnose without the aid of the diaphragm ultrasound. We therefore decided to avoid intubation, transfer the patient to the intensive care unit, and treat him conservatively with non-invasive ventilation only. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that has shown the usefulness of ultrasonography in detecting diaphragmatic dysfunction as a cause of acute respiratory failure with a subsequent change in patient management. The use of bedside ultrasonography provides practical functional information on the diaphragmatic function in patients with acute respiratory failure and can also be easily repeated if follow-up is required. This feature is still held in little consideration, but it can affect the diagnosis and the treatment of critically ill patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 30 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 6 19%
Other 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 72%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,631,186
of 12,786,839 outputs
Outputs from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#138
of 172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,551
of 223,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Ultrasound Journal
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,786,839 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 172 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,067 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.