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Discovery of radioactive silver (110mAg) in spiders and other fauna in the terrestrial environment after the meltdown of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B: Physical and Biological Sciences, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 263)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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243 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Discovery of radioactive silver (<sup>110m</sup>Ag) in spiders and other fauna in the terrestrial environment after the meltdown of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant
Published in
Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B: Physical and Biological Sciences, January 2015
DOI 10.2183/pjab.91.160
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiromi NAKANISHI, Atsushi MORI, Kouki TAKEDA, Houdo TANAKA, Natsuko KOBAYASHI, Keitaro TANOI, Takashi YAMAKAWA, Satoshi MORI

Abstract

Six months after the explosion of TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, radioactive silver ((110m)Ag), was detected in concentrations of 3754 Bq/kg in Nephila clavata (the orb-web spider; Joro-gumo in Japanese) collected at Nimaibashi, Iitate village in Fukushima Prefecture, whereas (110m)Ag in the soil was 43.1 Bq/kg. A survey of 35 faunal species in the terrestrial environment during the 3.5 years after the accident showed that most of Anthropoda had two orders higher (110m)Ag in their tissues than soils, although silver is not an essential element for their life. However, tracing of the activity of (110m)Ag detected in spider Atypus karschi collected regularly at a fixed location showed that it declined much faster than the physical half-life. These results suggest that (110m)Ag was at once biologically concentrated by faunal species, especially Arthropoda, through food chain. The factors affecting the subsequent rapid decline of (110m)Ag concentration in faunal species are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 243 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 2 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 25%
Student > Master 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Researcher 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 3 38%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Social Sciences 1 13%
Chemistry 1 13%
Other 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 199. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2019.
All research outputs
#62,954
of 13,089,117 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B: Physical and Biological Sciences
#7
of 263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,413
of 224,053 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Japan Academy, Series B: Physical and Biological Sciences
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,089,117 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,053 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them