↓ Skip to main content

Does intra-ruminal nitrogen recycling waste valuable resources? A review of major players and their manipulation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 323)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Does intra-ruminal nitrogen recycling waste valuable resources? A review of major players and their manipulation
Published in
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40104-018-0249-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Hartinger, Nina Gresner, Karl-Heinz Südekum

Abstract

Nitrogenous emissions from ruminant livestock production are of increasing public concern and, together with methane, contribute to environmental pollution. The main cause of nitrogen-(N)-containing emissions is the inadequate provision of N to ruminants, leading to an excess of ammonia in the rumen, which is subsequently excreted. Depending on the size and molecular structure, various bacterial, protozoal and fungal species are involved in the ruminal breakdown of nitrogenous compounds (NC). Decelerating ruminal NC degradation by controlling the abundance and activity of proteolytic and deaminating microorganisms, but without reducing cellulolytic processes, is a promising strategy to decrease N emissions along with increasing N utilization by ruminants. Different dietary options, including among others the treatment of feedstuffs with heat or the application of diverse feed additives, as well as vaccination against rumen microorganisms or their enzymes have been evaluated. Thereby, reduced productions of microbial metabolites, e.g. ammonia, and increased microbial N flows give evidence for an improved N retention. However, linkage between these findings and alterations in the rumen microbiota composition, particularly NC-degrading microbes, remains sparse and contradictory findings confound the exact evaluation of these manipulating strategies, thus emphasizing the need for comprehensive research. The demand for increased sustainability in ruminant livestock production requests to apply attention to microbial N utilization efficiency and this will require a better understanding of underlying metabolic processes as well as composition and interactions of ruminal NC-degrading microorganisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Master 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 11 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 10 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2018.
All research outputs
#4,039,311
of 13,526,754 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#45
of 323 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,500
of 269,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,526,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 323 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,986 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them