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Alternative futures for Borneo show the value of integrating economic and conservation targets across borders

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
88 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
128 Mendeley
Title
Alternative futures for Borneo show the value of integrating economic and conservation targets across borders
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms7819
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca K. Runting, Erik Meijaard, Nicola K. Abram, Jessie A. Wells, David L.A. Gaveau, Marc Ancrenaz, Hugh P. Possingham, Serge A. Wich, Fitrian Ardiansyah, Melvin T. Gumal, Laurentius N. Ambu, Kerrie A. Wilson

Abstract

Balancing economic development with international commitments to protect biodiversity is a global challenge. Achieving this balance requires an understanding of the possible consequences of alternative future scenarios for a range of stakeholders. We employ an integrated economic and environmental planning approach to evaluate four alternative futures for the mega-diverse island of Borneo. We show what could be achieved if the three national jurisdictions of Borneo coordinate efforts to achieve their public policy targets and allow a partial reallocation of planned land uses. We reveal the potential for Borneo to simultaneously retain ∼50% of its land as forests, protect adequate habitat for the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and Bornean elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis), and achieve an opportunity cost saving of over US$43 billion. Such coordination would depend on enhanced information sharing and reforms to land-use planning, which could be supported by the increasingly international nature of economies and conservation efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 128 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
India 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 117 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 21%
Student > Master 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 29 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 57 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 33%
Unspecified 14 11%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 3%
Other 7 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2018.
All research outputs
#174,124
of 12,485,588 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#3,232
of 20,792 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,388
of 224,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#54
of 608 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,588 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,792 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,599 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 608 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.