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Local and global pyrogeographic evidence that indigenous fire management creates pyrodiversity

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
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Title
Local and global pyrogeographic evidence that indigenous fire management creates pyrodiversity
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, April 2015
DOI 10.1002/ece3.1494
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clay Trauernicht, Barry W. Brook, Brett P. Murphy, Grant J. Williamson, David M. J. S. Bowman

Abstract

Despite the challenges wildland fire poses to contemporary resource management, many fire-prone ecosystems have adapted over centuries to millennia to intentional landscape burning by people to maintain resources. We combine fieldwork, modeling, and a literature survey to examine the extent and mechanism by which anthropogenic burning alters the spatial grain of habitat mosaics in fire-prone ecosystems. We survey the distribution of Callitris intratropica, a conifer requiring long fire-free intervals for establishment, as an indicator of long-unburned habitat availability under Aboriginal burning in the savannas of Arnhem Land. We then use cellular automata to simulate the effects of burning identical proportions of the landscape under different fire sizes on the emergent patterns of habitat heterogeneity. Finally, we examine the global extent of intentional burning and diversity of objectives using the scientific literature. The current distribution of Callitris across multiple field sites suggested long-unburnt patches are common and occur at fine scales (<0.5 ha), while modeling revealed smaller, patchy disturbances maximize patch age diversity, creating a favorable habitat matrix for Callitris. The literature search provided evidence for intentional landscape burning across multiple ecosystems on six continents, with the number of identified objectives ranging from two to thirteen per study. The fieldwork and modeling results imply that the occurrence of long-unburnt habitat in fire-prone ecosystems may be an emergent property of patch scaling under fire regimes dominated by smaller fires. These findings provide a model for understanding how anthropogenic burning alters spatial and temporal aspects of habitat heterogeneity, which, as the literature survey strongly suggests, warrant consideration across a diversity of geographies and cultures. Our results clarify how traditional fire management shapes fire-prone ecosystems, which despite diverse objectives, has allowed human societies to cope with fire as a recurrent disturbance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 138 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 23 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 15%
Student > Master 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 18 13%
Unknown 32 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 45 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 23%
Social Sciences 12 8%
Arts and Humanities 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 38 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2021.
All research outputs
#327,306
of 21,033,636 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#109
of 6,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,465
of 242,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#3
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,033,636 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,800 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.