↓ Skip to main content

Biofilm-forming ability and infection potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from animals and humans

Overview of attention for article published in Pathogens and Disease, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Biofilm-forming ability and infection potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from animals and humans
Published in
Pathogens and Disease, April 2018
DOI 10.1093/femspd/fty041
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dusan Milivojevic, Neven Šumonja, Strahinja Medić, Aleksandar Pavic, Ivana Moric, Branka Vasiljevic, Lidija Senerovic, Jasmina Nikodinovic-Runic

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been amongst top 10 'superbugs' worldwide and is causing infections with poor outcomes in both humans and animals. From 202 P. aeruginosa isolates (n = 121 animal and n = 81 human) 40 were selected on the basis of biofilm-forming ability and were comparatively characterized in terms of virulence determinants to the type strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. Biofilm formation, pyocyanin and hemolysins production and bacterial motility patterns were compared to the ability to kill human cell line A549 in vitro. On average, there was no significant difference between levels of animal and human cytotoxicity, while human isolates produced higher amounts of pyocyanin, hemolysins and showed increased swimming ability. Non-parametric statistical analysis identified the highest positive correlation between hemolysis and the swarming ability. For the first time an ensemble machine learning approach used on the in vitro virulence data determined the highest relative predictive importance of the submerged biofilm formation for the cytotoxicity, as an indicator of the infection ability. The findings from the in vitro study were validated in vivo using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study highlighted no major differences between P. aeruginosa species isolated from animal and human infections and the importance of pyocyanin-production in cytotoxicity and infection ability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Student > Master 8 22%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,421,807
of 12,846,518 outputs
Outputs from Pathogens and Disease
#413
of 494 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,885
of 269,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pathogens and Disease
#18
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,846,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 494 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,846 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.