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Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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289 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation
Published in
PLOS ONE, April 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0119470
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gregory N. Kawchuk, Jerome Fryer, Jacob L. Jaremko, Hongbo Zeng, Lindsay Rowe, Richard Thompson

Abstract

Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 479 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 289 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 4 1%
United States 3 1%
Australia 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 276 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 15%
Other 44 15%
Student > Master 37 13%
Student > Bachelor 31 11%
Researcher 30 10%
Other 76 26%
Unknown 27 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 105 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 9%
Engineering 24 8%
Sports and Recreations 13 4%
Other 46 16%
Unknown 40 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1452. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2021.
All research outputs
#5,070
of 19,509,094 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#54
of 173,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48
of 238,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2
of 5,357 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,509,094 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 173,150 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,423 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,357 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.