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Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) alters sexual differentiation in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta)

Overview of attention for article published in General & Comparative Endocrinology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 1,676)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
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Title
Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) alters sexual differentiation in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta)
Published in
General & Comparative Endocrinology, May 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.ygcen.2015.04.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caitlin M. Jandegian, Sharon L. Deem, Ramji K. Bhandari, Casey M. Holliday, Diane Nicks, Cheryl S. Rosenfeld, Kyle W. Selcer, Donald E. Tillitt, Frederick S. vom Saal, Vanessa Vélez-Rivera, Ying Yang, Dawn K. Holliday

Abstract

Environmental chemicals can disrupt endocrine signaling and adversely impact sexual differentiation in wildlife. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic chemical commonly found in a variety of habitats. In this study, we used painted turtles (Chrysemys picta), which have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), as an animal model for ontogenetic endocrine disruption by BPA. We hypothesized that BPA would override TSD and disrupt sexual development. We incubated farm-raised turtle eggs at the male-producing temperature (26°C), randomly assigned individuals to treatment groups: control, vehicle control, 17β-estradiol (E2, 20ng/g-egg) or 0.01, 1.0, 100μgBPA/g-egg and harvested tissues at hatch. Typical female gonads were present in 89% of the E2-treated "males", but in none of the control males (n=35). Gonads of BPA-exposed turtles had varying amounts of ovarian-like cortical (OLC) tissue and disorganized testicular tubules in the medulla. Although the percentage of males with OLCs increased with BPA dose (BPA-low=30%, BPA-medium=33%, BPA-high=39%), this difference was not significant (p=0.85). In all three BPA treatments, SOX9 patterns revealed disorganized medullary testicular tubules and β-catenin expression in a thickened cortex. Liver vitellogenin, a female-specific liver protein commonly used as an exposure biomarker, was not induced by any of the treatments. Notably, these results suggest that developmental exposure to BPA disrupts sexual differentiation in painted turtles. Further examination is necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of sex reversal in reptiles and how these translate to EDC exposure in wild populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 79 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 21%
Student > Bachelor 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 17%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 36%
Environmental Science 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 21 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2020.
All research outputs
#443,986
of 18,422,743 outputs
Outputs from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#9
of 1,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,083
of 236,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#1
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,422,743 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,676 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,374 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.