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Urbanization impact on mosquito community and the transmission potential of filarial infection in central Europe

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2018
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Title
Urbanization impact on mosquito community and the transmission potential of filarial infection in central Europe
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13071-018-2845-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Viktória Čabanová, Martina Miterpáková, Daniela Valentová, Hana Blažejová, Ivo Rudolf, Eduard Stloukal, Zuzana Hurníková, Marianna Dzidová

Abstract

Despite long-term research on dirofilariosis in Slovakia, little attention has thus far been paid to Dirofilaria vectors. The particular aim of the present study was molecular screening for filarioid parasites in two different habitats of Bratislava, the capital city of Slovakia. In addition, the effect of urbanisation on mosquito species abundance and composition, associated with the risk of mosquito-borne infections, was studied and discussed. Mosquitoes were identified by morphological features, and molecular methods were also used for determination of selected individuals belonging to cryptic species from the Anopheles maculipennis and Culex pipiens complexes. The presence of filarioid DNA (Dirofilaria repens, Dirofilaria immitis and Setaria spp.) was detected using standard PCR approaches and sequencing. A total of 6957 female mosquitoes were collected for the study. Overall, the most abundant mosquito species was Aedes vexans, closely followed by unidentified members of the Cx. pipiens complex and the less numerous but still plentiful Ochlerotatus sticticus species. Further investigation of mosquito material revealed 4.26% relative prevalence of Dirofilaria spp., whereby both species, D. repens and D. immitis, were identified. The majority of positive mosquito pools had their origin in a floodplain area on the outskirts of the city, with a relative prevalence of 5.32%; only two mosquito pools (1.26%) were shown to be positive in the residential zone of Bratislava. Setaria spp. DNA was not detected in mosquitoes within this study. The study presented herein represents initial research focused on molecular mosquito screening for filarioid parasites in urban and urban-fringe habitats of Bratislava, Slovakia. Molecular analyses within the Cx. pipiens complex identified two biotypes: Cx. pipiens biotype pipiens and Cx. pipiens biotype molestus. To our knowledge, Dirofilaria spp. were detected for the first time in Slovakia in mosquitoes other than Ae. vexans, i.e. D. repens in Anopheles messeae and unidentified members of An. maculipennis and Cx. pipiens complexes, and D. immitis in Coquillettidia richiardii and Cx. pipiens biotype pipiens. Both dirofilarial species were found in Och. sticticus. The suitable conditions for the vectors' biology would represent the main risk factor for dirofilariosis transmission.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 33%
Unspecified 4 19%
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 29%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,844,344
of 12,852,852 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,164
of 3,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,649
of 269,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,852,852 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,348 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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