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Prospective observational study to evaluate the clinical safety of the fixed-dose artemisinin-based combination Eurartesim® (dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine), in public health facilities in Burkina…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2015
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3 tweeters

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Title
Prospective observational study to evaluate the clinical safety of the fixed-dose artemisinin-based combination Eurartesim® (dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine), in public health facilities in Burkina Faso, Mozambique, Ghana, and Tanzania
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0664-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rita Baiden, Abraham Oduro, Tinto Halidou, Margaret Gyapong, Ali Sie, Eusebio Macete, Salim Abdulla, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Abdunoor Mulokozi, Alex Adjei, Esperanca Sevene, Guillaume Compaoré, Innocent Valea, Isaac Osei, Abena Yawson, Martin Adjuik, Raymond Akparibo, Bernhards Ogutu, Gabriel Leonard Upunda, Peter Smith, Fred Binka

Abstract

The World Health Organization recommends artemisinin-based combination (ACT) for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Post-licensure safety data on newly registered ACT is critical for evaluating their risk/benefit profile in malaria endemic countries. The clinical safety of the newly registered combination, Eurartesim®, following its introduction into the public health system in four African countries was assessed. This was a prospective, observational, open-label, non-comparative, longitudinal, multi-centre study using cohort event monitoring. Patients with confirmed malaria had their first dose observed and instructed on how to take the second and the third doses at home. Patients were contacted on day 5 ± 2 to assess adherence and adverse events (AEs). Spontaneous reporting of AEs was continued till day 28. A nested cohort who completed full treatment course had repeated electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements to assess effect on QTc interval. A total of 10,925 uncomplicated malaria patients were treated with Eurartesim®. Most patients,95% (10,359/10,925), did not report any adverse event following at least one dose of Eurartesim®. A total of 797 adverse events were reported. The most frequently reported, by system organ classification, were infections and infestations (3. 24%) and gastrointestinal disorders (1. 37%). In the nested cohort, no patient had QTcF > 500 ms prior to day 3 pre-dose 3. Three patients had QTcF > 500 ms (509 ms, 501 ms, 538 ms) three to four hours after intake of the last dose. All the QTcF values in the three patients had returned to <500 ms at the next scheduled ECG on day 7 (470 ms, 442 ms, 411 ms). On day 3 pre- and post-dose 3, 70 and 89 patients, respectively, had a QTcF increase of ≥ 60 ms compared to their baseline, but returned to nearly baseline values on day 7. Eurartesim® single course treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria is well-tolerated. QT interval prolongation above 500 ms may occur at a rate of three per 1,002 patients after the third dose with no association of any clinical symptoms. QT interval prolongation above 60 ms was detected in less than 10% of the patients without any clinical abnormalities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Burkina Faso 1 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
Indonesia 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 85 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 18%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 15%
Other 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 24 26%
Unknown 9 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 38%
Social Sciences 10 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 14 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,448,307
of 5,039,474 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,156
of 1,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,448
of 144,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#73
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,039,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,999 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.