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Resistance to Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie Dog Populations

Overview of attention for article published in Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases, February 2012
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Title
Resistance to Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie Dog Populations
Published in
Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases, February 2012
DOI 10.1089/vbz.2011.0602
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tonie E. Rocke, Judy Williamson, Kacy R. Cobble, Joseph D. Busch, Michael F. Antolin, David M. Wagner

Abstract

In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogeneous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 11%
Unknown 41 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 33%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 57%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2011.
All research outputs
#3,095,095
of 4,506,935 outputs
Outputs from Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases
#315
of 495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,450
of 66,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases
#14
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,506,935 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 495 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 66,122 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.