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Environmental variability drives shifts in the foraging behaviour and reproductive success of an inshore seabird

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Environmental variability drives shifts in the foraging behaviour and reproductive success of an inshore seabird
Published in
Oecologia, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00442-015-3294-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicole D. Kowalczyk, Richard D. Reina, Tiana J. Preston, André Chiaradia

Abstract

Marine animals forage in areas that aggregate prey to maximize their energy intake. However, these foraging 'hot spots' experience environmental variability, which can substantially alter prey availability. To survive and reproduce animals need to modify their foraging in response to these prey shifts. By monitoring their inter-annual foraging behaviours, we can understand which environmental variables affect their foraging efficiency, and can assess how they respond to environmental variability. Here, we monitored the foraging behaviour and isotopic niche of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), over 3 years (2008, 2011, and 2012) of climatic and prey variability within Port Phillip Bay, Australia. During drought (2008), penguins foraged in close proximity to the Yarra River outlet on a predominantly anchovy-based diet. In periods of heavy rainfall, when water depth in the largest tributary into the bay (Yarra River) was high, the total distance travelled, maximum distance travelled, distance to core-range, and size of core- and home-ranges of penguins increased significantly. This larger foraging range was associated with broad dietary diversity and high reproductive success. These results suggest the increased foraging range and dietary diversity of penguins were a means to maximize resource acquisition rather than a strategy to overcome local depletions in prey. Our results demonstrate the significance of the Yarra River in structuring predator-prey interactions in this enclosed bay, as well as the flexible foraging strategies of penguins in response to environmental variability. This plasticity is central to the survival of this small-ranging, resident seabird species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 67 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 31%
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 16 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 75%
Environmental Science 9 13%
Unspecified 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,474,100
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,084
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,310
of 225,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#34
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,960 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.