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Trends in prevalence of selected opportunistic infections associated with HIV/AIDS in Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Trends in prevalence of selected opportunistic infections associated with HIV/AIDS in Uganda
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0927-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Rubaihayo, Nazarius M Tumwesigye, Joseph Konde-Lule

Abstract

After more than a decade of establishing and expanding access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), empirical evidence on its impact on trends of opportunistic infections (OIs) associated with the deadly human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in resource poor settings is scarce. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of HAART coverage on trends of five most common OIs in Uganda. Observational data from January 2002 to December 2013 for 5972 HIV positive individuals attending the AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) HIV/AIDS care programme in Uganda were extracted and analysed. Trends were analysed using autoregressive moving average time series and mixed effects linear regression models adjusting for all available potential confounders. A total of 204,871 monthly medical reports were retrieved and analysed. Majority of the participants were female (73%) with a median age of 32 years (inter-quartile range 26-39). Overall, significant decreasing mean annual prevalence trends were observed for mycobacterium tuberculosis, herpes zoster, genital ulcer and oral candidiasis (p < 0.05, X(2) trend). Non-significant declining mean annual prevalence trend was observed for cryptococcal meningitis (p = 0.181, X(2) trend). The largest impact of HAART was observed in Oral candidiasis and TB whose average annual prevalence reduced by 61% and 43% respectively following the introduction of HAART. Monthly series for TB, Herpes zoster and genital ulcers differed significantly by age and clinic but only genital ulcer series differed significantly by sex (p < 0.05, kruskal wallis). After controlling for the effects of age, sex and clinic (fixed) and monthly clustering (random effect) in a mixed effects linear regression model, all the five OIs showed a significant monthly change in prevalence (p < 0.001). Overall, prevalence of most OIs declined especially after the introduction of HAART. However significant variations exist in the trends of different OIs in different geographical areas in Uganda. It is therefore important that site specific factors are properly identified to enable the development of targeted interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 64 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 21%
Student > Master 13 19%
Unspecified 10 15%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 40%
Unspecified 13 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,323,305
of 5,067,557 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,190
of 2,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,448
of 154,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#38
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,067,557 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.