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Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection in children is associated with increased auto-antibody production, high IL-10 plasma levels and antibodies to merozoite surface protein 3

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection in children is associated with increased auto-antibody production, high IL-10 plasma levels and antibodies to merozoite surface protein 3
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0658-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vincent Guiyedi, Christophe Bécavin, Fabien Herbert, Julian Gray, Pierre-André Cazenave, Maryvonne Kombila, Andrea Crisanti, Constantin Fesel, Sylviane Pied

Abstract

Mechanisms of acquired protection to malaria in asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum carriers are only partially understood. Among them, the role plays by the self-reactive antibodies has not been clarified yet. In this study, the relationship between repertoires of circulating self-reactive and parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), their correlation with cytokine levels, and their association with protection against malaria was investigated in asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum-infected Gabonese children. The diversity of P. falciparum-specific antibody repertoire was analysed using a protein micro-array immunoassay, the total auto-antibody repertoire by quantitative immunoblotting and circulating cytokine levels were measured by ELISA in endemic controls (EC) and P. falciparum-infected children from Gabon with asymptomatic (AM) or mild malaria (MM). The association of self- and parasite-specific antibody repertoires with circulating cytokines was evaluated using single linkage hierarchical clustering, Kruskal - Wallis tests and Spearman's rank correlation. Children with AM exhibited an IgG response to merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) but not to MSP1-19, although their levels of total P. falciparum-specific IgG were similar to those in the MM group. Moreover, the asymptomatic children had increased levels of autoantibodies recognising brain antigens. In addition, a correlation between IL-10 levels and parasite load was found in AM and MM children. These two groups also exhibited significant correlations between plasma levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ with age and with total plasma IgG levels. IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were also associated with auto-antibody responses in AM. Altogether, these results indicate that a self-reactive polyclonal response associated with increased IgG to MSP3 and high plasma levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ may contribute to protective immune mechanisms triggered in asymptomatic P. falciparum infection in Gabonese children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Master 6 13%
Other 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 13%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2015.
All research outputs
#8,425,148
of 16,121,523 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,445
of 4,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,241
of 231,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,121,523 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,231 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them