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Prevalence of disorders recorded in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels attending primary-care veterinary practices in England

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, April 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

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6 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence of disorders recorded in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels attending primary-care veterinary practices in England
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40575-015-0016-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer F Summers, Dan G O’Neill, David B Church, Peter C Thomson, Paul D McGreevy, David C Brodbelt

Abstract

Concerns have been raised over breed-related health issues in purebred dogs, but reliable prevalence estimates for disorders within specific breeds are sparse. Electronically stored patient health records from primary-care practice are emerging as a useful source of epidemiological data in companion animals. This study used large volumes of health data from UK primary-care practices participating in the VetCompass animal health surveillance project to evaluate in detail the disorders diagnosed in a random selection of over 50% of dogs recorded as Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs). Confirmation of breed using available microchip and Kennel Club (KC) registration data was attempted. In total, 3624 dogs were recorded as CKCSs within the VetCompass database of which 143 (3.9%) were confirmed as KC-registered via microchip identification linkage of VetCompass to the KC database. 1875 dogs (75 KC registered and 1800 of unknown KC status, 52% of both groups) were randomly sampled for detailed clinical review. Clinical data associated with veterinary care were recorded in 1749 (93.3%) of these dogs. The most common specific disorders recorded during the study period were heart murmur (541 dogs, representing 30.9% of study group), diarrhoea of unspecified cause (193 dogs, 11.0%), dental disease (166 dogs, 9.5%), otitis externa (161, 9.2%), conjunctivitis (131, 7.4%) and anal sac infection (129, 7.4%). The five most common disorder categories were cardiac (affecting 31.7% of dogs), dermatological (22.2%), ocular (20.6%), gastrointestinal (19.3%) and dental/periodontal disorders (15.2%). Study findings suggest that many of the disorders commonly affecting CKCSs are largely similar to those affecting the general dog population presented for primary veterinary care in the UK. However, cardiac disease (and MVD in particular) continues to be of particular concern in this breed. This work highlights the value of veterinary practice based breed-specific epidemiological studies to provide targeted and evidence-based health policies. Further studies using electronic patient records in other breeds could highlight their potential disease predispositions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Other 6 15%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 19 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 15%
Mathematics 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2021.
All research outputs
#5,570,205
of 19,040,944 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#42
of 74 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,510
of 238,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,040,944 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.9. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,912 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them