↓ Skip to main content

A novel member of the let-7 microRNA family is associated with developmental transitions in filarial nematode parasites

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A novel member of the let-7 microRNA family is associated with developmental transitions in filarial nematode parasites
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1536-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan D Winter, Victoria Gillan, Kirsty Maitland, Richard D Emes, Brett Roberts, Gillian McCormack, William Weir, Anna V Protasio, Nancy Holroyd, Matthew Berriman, Collette Britton, Eileen Devaney

Abstract

Filarial nematodes are important pathogens in the tropics transmitted to humans via the bite of blood sucking arthropod vectors. The molecular mechanisms underpinning survival and differentiation of these parasites following transmission are poorly understood. microRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate target mRNAs and we set out to investigate whether they play a role in the infection event. microRNAs differentially expressed during the early post-infective stages of Brugia pahangi L3 were identified by microarray analysis. One of these, bpa-miR-5364, was selected for further study as it is upregulated ~12-fold at 24 hours post-infection, is specific to clade III nematodes, and is a novel member of the let-7 family, which are known to have key developmental functions in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Predicted mRNA targets of bpa-miR-5364 were identified using bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches that relied on the conservation of miR-5364 binding sites in the orthologous mRNAs of other filarial nematodes. Finally, we confirmed the interaction between bpa-miR-5364 and three of its predicted targets using a dual luciferase assay. These data provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms underpinning the transmission of third stage larvae of filarial nematodes from vector to mammal. This study is the first to identify parasitic nematode mRNAs that are verified targets of specific microRNAs and demonstrates that post-transcriptional control of gene expression via stage-specific expression of microRNAs may be important in the success of filarial infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 30%
Researcher 10 23%
Student > Master 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2016.
All research outputs
#1,605,268
of 12,378,406 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#837
of 7,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,593
of 228,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#35
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,406 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,251 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.