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Most atolls will be uninhabitable by the mid-21st century because of sea-level rise exacerbating wave-driven flooding

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
104 news outlets
blogs
25 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
650 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
6 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
209 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
414 Mendeley
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Title
Most atolls will be uninhabitable by the mid-21st century because of sea-level rise exacerbating wave-driven flooding
Published in
Science Advances, April 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aap9741
Pubmed ID
Authors

Curt D. Storlazzi, Stephen B. Gingerich, Ap van Dongeren, Olivia M. Cheriton, Peter W. Swarzenski, Ellen Quataert, Clifford I. Voss, Donald W. Field, Hariharasubramanian Annamalai, Greg A. Piniak, Robert McCall

Abstract

Sea levels are rising, with the highest rates in the tropics, where thousands of low-lying coral atoll islands are located. Most studies on the resilience of these islands to sea-level rise have projected that they will experience minimal inundation impacts until at least the end of the 21st century. However, these have not taken into account the additional hazard of wave-driven overwash or its impact on freshwater availability. We project the impact of sea-level rise and wave-driven flooding on atoll infrastructure and freshwater availability under a variety of climate change scenarios. We show that, on the basis of current greenhouse gas emission rates, the nonlinear interactions between sea-level rise and wave dynamics over reefs will lead to the annual wave-driven overwash of most atoll islands by the mid-21st century. This annual flooding will result in the islands becoming uninhabitable because of frequent damage to infrastructure and the inability of their freshwater aquifers to recover between overwash events. This study provides critical information for understanding the timing and magnitude of climate change impacts on atoll islands that will result in significant, unavoidable geopolitical issues if it becomes necessary to abandon and relocate low-lying island states.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 650 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 414 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 414 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 72 17%
Student > Master 67 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 60 14%
Student > Bachelor 36 9%
Other 21 5%
Other 61 15%
Unknown 97 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 78 19%
Environmental Science 69 17%
Engineering 38 9%
Social Sciences 30 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 7%
Other 53 13%
Unknown 117 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1430. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2022.
All research outputs
#7,071
of 23,052,509 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#101
of 9,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133
of 329,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#2
of 237 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,052,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,978 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 121.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 237 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.