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Transient and Partial Nuclear Lamina Disruption Promotes Chromosome Movement in Early Meiotic Prophase

Overview of attention for article published in Developmental Cell, April 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Transient and Partial Nuclear Lamina Disruption Promotes Chromosome Movement in Early Meiotic Prophase
Published in
Developmental Cell, April 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.devcel.2018.03.018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jana Link, Dimitra Paouneskou, Maria Velkova, Anahita Daryabeigi, Triin Laos, Sara Labella, Consuelo Barroso, Sarai Pacheco Piñol, Alex Montoya, Holger Kramer, Alexander Woglar, Antoine Baudrimont, Sebastian Mathias Markert, Christian Stigloher, Enrique Martinez-Perez, Alexander Dammermann, Manfred Alsheimer, Monique Zetka, Verena Jantsch

Abstract

Meiotic chromosome movement is important for the pairwise alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is required for correct chromosome segregation. Movement is driven by cytoplasmic forces, transmitted to chromosome ends by nuclear membrane-spanning proteins. In animal cells, lamins form a prominent scaffold at the nuclear periphery, yet the role lamins play in meiotic chromosome movement is unclear. We show that chromosome movement correlates with reduced lamin association with the nuclear rim, which requires lamin phosphorylation at sites analogous to those that open lamina network crosslinks in mitosis. Failure to remodel the lamina results in delayed meiotic entry, altered chromatin organization, unpaired or interlocked chromosomes, and slowed chromosome movement. The remodeling kinases are delivered to lamins via chromosome ends coupled to the nuclear envelope, potentially enabling crosstalk between the lamina and chromosomal events. Thus, opening the lamina network plays a role in modulating contacts between chromosomes and the nuclear periphery during meiosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 31%
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,381,544
of 15,183,934 outputs
Outputs from Developmental Cell
#1,673
of 3,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,578
of 277,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Developmental Cell
#46
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,183,934 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,337 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.