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A multicohort, longitudinal study of cerebellar development in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

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6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
A multicohort, longitudinal study of cerebellar development in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Published in
Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, April 2018
DOI 10.1111/jcpp.12920
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip Shaw, Ayaka Ishii-Takahashi, Min Tae Park, Gabriel A. Devenyi, Chava Zibman, Steven Kasparek, Gustavo Sudre, Aman Mangalmurti, Martine Hoogman, Henning Tiemeier, Georg von Polier, Devon Shook, Ryan Muetzel, M. Mallar Chakravarty, Kerstin Konrad, Sarah Durston, Tonya White

Abstract

The cerebellum supports many cognitive functions disrupted in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Prior neuroanatomic studies have been often limited by small sample sizes, inconsistent findings, and a reliance on cross-sectional data, limiting inferences about cerebellar development. Here, we conduct a multicohort study using longitudinal data, to characterize cerebellar development. Growth trajectories of the cerebellar vermis, hemispheres and white matter were estimated using piecewise linear regression from 1,656 youth; of whom 63% had longitudinal data, totaling 2,914 scans. Four cohorts participated, all contained childhood data (age 4-12 years); two had adolescent data (12-25 years). Growth parameters were combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Diagnostic differences in growth were confined to the corpus medullare (cerebellar white matter). Here, the ADHD group showed slower growth in early childhood compared to the typically developing group (left corpus medullare z = 2.49, p = .01; right z = 2.03, p = .04). This reversed in late childhood, with faster growth in ADHD in the left corpus medullare (z = 2.06, p = .04). Findings held when gender, intelligence, comorbidity, and psychostimulant medication were considered. Across four independent cohorts, containing predominately longitudinal data, we found diagnostic differences in the growth of cerebellar white matter. In ADHD, slower white matter growth in early childhood was followed by faster growth in late childhood. The findings are consistent with the concept of ADHD as a disorder of the brain's structural connections, formed partly by developing cortico-cerebellar white matter tracts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 28%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 15 38%
Psychology 13 33%
Neuroscience 6 15%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2018.
All research outputs
#3,857,651
of 13,221,142 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry
#1,262
of 2,332 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,574
of 268,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry
#35
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,221,142 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,332 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,984 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.