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Adaptive population divergence and directional gene flow across steep elevational gradients in a climate-sensitive mammal

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Adaptive population divergence and directional gene flow across steep elevational gradients in a climate-sensitive mammal
Published in
Molecular Ecology, May 2018
DOI 10.1111/mec.14701
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew D. Waterhouse, Liesl P. Erb, Erik A. Beever, Michael A. Russello

Abstract

The ecological effects of climate change have been shown in most major taxonomic groups; however, the evolutionary consequences are less well-documented. Adaptation to new climatic conditions offers a potential long-term mechanism for species to maintain viability in rapidly changing environments, but mammalian examples remain scarce. The American pika (Ochotona princeps) has been impacted by recent climate-associated extirpations and range-wide reductions in population sizes, establishing it as a sentinel mammalian species for climate change. To investigate evidence for local adaptation and reconstruct patterns of genomic diversity and gene flow across rapidly changing environments, we used a space-for-time design and restriction site-associated DNA sequencing to genotype American pikas along two steep elevational gradients at 30,966 SNPs and employed independent outlier detection methods that scanned for genotype-environment associations. We identified 338 outlier SNPs detected by two separate analyses and/or replicated in both transects, several of which were annotated to genes involved in metabolic function and oxygen transport. Additionally, we found evidence of directional gene flow primarily downslope from high-elevation populations, along with reduced gene flow at outlier loci. If this trend continues, elevational range contractions in American pikas will likely be from local extirpation rather than upward movement of low-elevation individuals; this, in turn, could limit the potential for adaptation within this landscape. These findings are of particular relevance for future conservation and management of American pikas and other elevationally-restricted, thermally-sensitive species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Researcher 4 5%
Professor 3 4%
Student > Master 3 4%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 50 65%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Unspecified 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 50 65%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2018.
All research outputs
#667,442
of 12,354,360 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#380
of 4,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,103
of 270,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#24
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,360 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.