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Characteristics of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled diabetes in north Queensland: implications for services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Characteristics of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled diabetes in north Queensland: implications for services
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1660-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Ross Johnson, Robyn Anne McDermott, Peter Marshall Clifton, Katina D’Onise, Sean Matthew Taylor, Cilla Louise Preece, Barbara Anne Schmidt

Abstract

Indigenous Australian adults with diabetes continue to have suboptimal clinical control and poorer outcomes compared with non-Indigenous people although there is a paucity of data documenting the detailed health status of Indigenous people in Australia. To further investigate the characteristics of Indigenous Australian adults with poorly controlled diabetes we analysed baseline data from a cluster randomized trial aiming to deliver a program of integrated community-based intensive chronic disease management for Indigenous people in remote communities in far north Queensland, Australia. Indigenous adults aged 18 to 65 years from 12 clinics in rural north Queensland with established type 2 diabetes and with HbA1c ≥8.5% were invited to participate. The primary outcome variable measured at baseline was HbA1c. Other variables measured included socio-demographic indicators, health literacy, BMI, blood pressure, lipids, renal function, smoking status and quality of life measures. Data were collected between December 2010 and July 2011. Analysis was performed by ethnicity - Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. One hundred and ninety three participants were included in the analysis. Very high rates of albuminuria, high rates of smoking, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and elevated BMI were recorded. Aboriginal participants reported higher levels of socio-economic disadvantage, higher smoking rates, lower BMI and worse self-reported health status than Torres Strait Islander participants. These results demonstrate a high potential for improved culturally sound community-based management of diabetes and other comorbid conditions in this very high risk population. They also provide further evidence for including albuminuria in cardiovascular risk calculation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Student > Master 18 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 13%
Social Sciences 9 9%
Psychology 8 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 4%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 22 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,236,376
of 15,490,646 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,662
of 10,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,025
of 230,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,490,646 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,903 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them