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Multiple sclerosis outpatient future groups: improving the quality of participant interaction and ideation tools within service improvement activities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple sclerosis outpatient future groups: improving the quality of participant interaction and ideation tools within service improvement activities
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0773-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alison Thomson, Carol Rivas, Gavin Giovannoni

Abstract

Improving the patient experience is a key focus within the National Health Service. This has led us to consider how health services are experienced, from both staff and patient perspectives. Novel service improvement activities bring staff and patients together to use design-led methods to improve how health services are delivered. The Multiple Sclerosis Outpatient Future Group study aimed to explore how analogies and props can be used to facilitate rich interactions between staff and patients within these activities. This paper will consider how these interactions supported participants to share experiences, generate ideas and suggest service improvements. Qualitative explorative study using 'future groups,' a reinterpretation of the recognised focus groups method directed towards exploring future alternatives through employing analogies and physical props to engage participants to speculate about future service interactions and health experiences. Participants were people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and outpatient staff: staff nurses, nursing assistants, junior sisters and reception staff. Use of future groups, analogies and physical props enabled PwMS and outpatient staff to invest their own ideas and feelings in the service improvement activity and envisage alternative health care scenarios. The combination of participants in the groups with their diverse perspectives and knowledge of the service led to a collaborative approach in which staff highlighted potential practical problems and patients ensured ideas were holistic. Service improvements were prototyped and tested in the outpatient clinic. Design-led methods such as future groups using analogies and physical props can be used to facilitate interactions between staff and patients in service improvement activities, leading to the generation of meaningful ideas. It is hoped that improving the quality of ideation tools within design-led methods can contribute to developing successful service interventions in service improvement activities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 30%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 26%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Computer Science 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,383,748
of 13,786,654 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#591
of 4,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,715
of 228,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#13
of 157 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,786,654 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,650 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,007 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 157 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.