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Return Migration as Failure or Success?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of International Migration and Integration, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
Return Migration as Failure or Success?
Published in
Journal of International Migration and Integration, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/s12134-014-0344-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hein de Haas, Tineke Fokkema, Mohamed Fassi Fihri

Abstract

Different migration theories generate competing hypotheses with regard to determinants of return migration. While neoclassical migration theory associates migration to the failure to integrate at the destination, the new economics of labour migration sees return migration as the logical stage after migrants have earned sufficient assets and knowledge and to invest in their origin countries. The projected return is then likely to be postponed for sustained or indefinite periods if integration is unsuccessful. So, from an indication or result of integration failure return is rather seen as a measure of success. Drawing on recent survey data (N = 2,832), this article tests these hypotheses by examining the main determinants of return intention among Moroccan migrants across Europe. The results indicate that structural integration through labour market participation, education and the maintenance of economic and social ties with receiving countries do not significantly affect return intentions. At the same time, investments and social ties to Morocco are positively related, and socio-cultural integration in receiving countries is negatively related to return migration intentions. The mixed results corroborate the idea that there is no uniform process of (return) migration and that competing theories might therefore be partly complementary.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Thailand 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 81 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 24%
Student > Master 14 17%
Unspecified 10 12%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 23 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 41 49%
Unspecified 12 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 9 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Other 12 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#2,219,291
of 12,691,046 outputs
Outputs from Journal of International Migration and Integration
#63
of 215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,153
of 227,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of International Migration and Integration
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,691,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 215 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them