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Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in older people without known cognitive impairment

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
51 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
195 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
591 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in older people without known cognitive impairment
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd005381.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeremy Young, Maaike Angevaren, Jennifer Rusted, Naji Tabet

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that physical activity supports healthy ageing. Exercise is helpful for cardiovascular, respiratory and musculoskeletal systems, among others. Aerobic activity, in particular, improves cardiovascular fitness and, based on recently reported findings, may also have beneficial effects on cognition among older people. To assess the effect of aerobic physical activity, aimed at improving cardiorespiratory fitness, on cognitive function in older people without known cognitive impairment. We searched ALOIS - the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL) (all years to Issue 2 of 4, 2013), MEDLINE (Ovid SP 1946 to August 2013), EMBASE (Ovid SP 1974 to August 2013), PEDro, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, PsycINFO (Ovid SP 1806 to August 2013), CINAHL (all dates to August 2013), LILACS (all dates to August 2013), World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (http://apps.who.int/trialsearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (https://clinicaltrials.gov) and Dissertation Abstracts International (DAI) up to 24 August 2013, with no language restrictions. We included all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect on cognitive function of aerobic physical activity programmes with any other active intervention, or no intervention, in cognitively healthy participants aged over 55 years. Two review authors independently extracted the data from included trials. We grouped cognitive outcome measures into eleven categories covering attention, memory, perception, executive functions, cognitive inhibition, cognitive speed and motor function. We used the mean difference (or standardised mean difference) between groups as the measure of the treatment effect and synthesised data using a random-effects model. We conducted separate analyses to compare aerobic exercise interventions with no intervention and with other exercise, social or cognitive interventions. Also, we performed analyses including only trials in which an increase in the cardiovascular fitness of participants had been demonstrated. Twelve trials including 754 participants met our inclusion criteria. Trials were from eight to 26 weeks in duration.We judged all trials to be at moderate or high risk of bias in at least some domains. Reporting of some risk of bias domains was poor.Our analyses comparing aerobic exercise to any active intervention showed no evidence of benefit from aerobic exercise in any cognitive domain. This was also true of our analyses comparing aerobic exercise to no intervention. Analysing only the subgroup of trials in which cardiorespiratory fitness improved in the aerobic exercise group showed that this improvement did not coincide with improvements in any cognitive domains assessed. Our subgroup analyses of aerobic exercise versus flexibility or balance interventions also showed no benefit of aerobic exercise in any cognitive domain.Dropout rates did not differ between aerobic exercise and control groups. No trial reported on adverse effects.Overall none of our analyses showed a cognitive benefit from aerobic exercise even when the intervention was shown to lead to improved cardiorespiratory fitness. We found no evidence in the available data from RCTs that aerobic physical activities, including those which successfully improve cardiorespiratory fitness, have any cognitive benefit in cognitively healthy older adults. Larger studies examining possible moderators are needed to confirm whether or not aerobic training improves cognition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 591 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 573 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 104 18%
Student > Bachelor 102 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 90 15%
Researcher 53 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 50 8%
Other 125 21%
Unknown 67 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 141 24%
Psychology 90 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 63 11%
Sports and Recreations 54 9%
Neuroscience 50 8%
Other 97 16%
Unknown 96 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 56. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2019.
All research outputs
#329,235
of 13,953,606 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#868
of 10,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,098
of 228,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#22
of 232 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,953,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 232 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.