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Treatment of Febrile illness with artemisinin combination therapy: prevalence and predictors in five African household surveys

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2015
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2 tweeters

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment of Febrile illness with artemisinin combination therapy: prevalence and predictors in five African household surveys
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40545-014-0024-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine E Vialle-Valentin, Robert F LeCates, Fang Zhang, Dennis Ross-Degnan

Abstract

To evaluate the determinants of compliance with national policies recommending Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT) for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the community. We used data from Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda national household surveys that were conducted with a standardized World Health Organization (WHO) methodology to measure access to and use of medicines. We analyzed all episodes of acute fever reported in the five surveys. We used logistic regression models accounting for the clustered design of the surveys to identify determinants of seeking care in public healthcare facilities, of being treated with antimalarials, and of receiving ACT. Overall, 92% of individuals with a febrile episode sought care outside the home, 96% received medicines, 67% were treated with antimalarials, and 16% received ACT. The choice of provider was influenced by perceptions about medicines availability and affordability. In addition, seeking care in a public healthcare facility was the single most important predictor of treatment with ACT [odds ratio (OR): 4.64, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.98-7.22, P < 0.001]. Children under 5 years old were more likely than adults to be treated with antimalarials [OR: 1.28, CI: 0.91-1.79, not significant (NS)] but less likely to receive ACT (OR: 0.80, CI: 0.57-1.13, NS). Our results confirm the high prevalence of presumptive antimalarial treatment for acute fever, especially in public healthcare facilities where poor people seek care. They show that perceptions about access to medicines shape behaviors by directing patients and caregivers to sources of care where they believe medicines are accessible. The success of national policies recommending ACT for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria depends not only on restricting ACT to confirmed malaria cases, but also on ensuring that ACT is available and affordable for those who need it.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Other 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 56%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2015.
All research outputs
#5,444,783
of 9,651,991 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#117
of 138 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,345
of 212,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#8
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,651,991 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.