↓ Skip to main content

An observational study of immigrant mortality differences in Norway by reason for migration, length of stay and characteristics of sending countries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
An observational study of immigrant mortality differences in Norway by reason for migration, length of stay and characteristics of sending countries
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5435-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Astri Syse, Minja T. Dzamarija, Bernadette N. Kumar, Esperanza Diaz

Abstract

Knowledge of mortality differentials in immigrant groups depending on their reason for migration, length of stay in host countries and characteristics of sending countries may be beneficial for policy interventions aimed to improve various immigrant groups' health and welfare. We employed discrete-time hazard regression models with time-varying covariates to compare the death risk of immigrants to those of Norwegian-born natives using linked register data on the Norwegian population aged 25-79 during 1990-2015. More than 492,000 deaths occurred in around 4.6 million individuals. All analyses were adjusted for sex, age, calendar time and sociodemographic characteristics. Immigrants had an 11% survival advantage overall. Those immigrating due to work or education had the lowest death risk, whereas refugees had the highest death risk (albeit lower than that of natives). Death risks increased markedly with length of stay, and were most pronounced for those having spent more than 40% of their lives in Norway. Net of reason for migration, only minor differences were observed depending on Human Development Index characteristics of sending countries. Independent of reason for migration and characteristics of sending countries, those who immigrate to Norway in adulthood appear to be particularly healthy. The higher death risk associated with prolonged lengths of stay suggests that disadvantageous 'acculturation' or stress factors related to the post-migration period may play a role in the long run. The health and welfare of long-term immigrants thus warrants further research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 24%
Social Sciences 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Psychology 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2019.
All research outputs
#1,402,370
of 14,551,860 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,680
of 10,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,386
of 274,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,551,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,068 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them