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Epigenetic reprogramming of melanoma cells by vitamin C treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

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12 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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33 Dimensions

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Epigenetic reprogramming of melanoma cells by vitamin C treatment
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0087-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher B Gustafson, Cuixia Yang, Kevin M Dickson, Hongwei Shao, Derek Van Booven, J William Harbour, Zhao-Jun Liu, Gaofeng Wang

Abstract

The loss of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has been identified as a novel epigenetic hallmark for melanoma. One of the known mechanisms underlying the loss of 5hmC is the decrease in expression of ten-eleven translocation family dioxygenase (TET) genes, which encode enzymes that catalyze the generation of 5hmC. Overexpressing TET2 was shown to partially reestablish a normal 5hmC profile in melanoma and decrease invasiveness in rodents. However, the feasibility to overexpress TETs in patients remains unclear. We and others have recently demonstrated that TETs require vitamin C as a cofactor to generate 5hmC. This finding prompted us to test whether vitamin C, as an alternative to overexpressing TETs, could rebuild 5hmC content in melanoma. Consistent with previous reports, we found that the expression of TETs was decreased in various melanoma cell lines. In contrast, the expressions of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (SVCTs) were down-regulated in cell lines derived from melanoma metastases. Treatment of vitamin C at the physiological level (0.1 mM) promoted the content of 5hmC in melanoma cell lines derived from different stages toward the level of healthy melanocytes, which was comparable to the effect of overexpressing TET2. Vitamin C treatment decreased the malignancy of metastatic A2058 cells by inhibiting migration and anchorage-independent growth, while not exerting any effect on the rate of proliferation. Further, vitamin C treatment caused alterations in genome-wide transcriptions shown by RNA-seq, predominantly in ArhGAP30 and genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, which could underlie the decreased malignant phenotypes. Our data support the idea that vitamin C treatment increases 5hmC content in melanoma cells, while causing a decrease in tumor-cell invasiveness and clonogenic growth in soft agar. Thus, vitamin C could be a potential epigenetic treatment for melanoma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 1 2%
Unknown 52 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 30%
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,978,172
of 12,786,839 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#127
of 603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,537
of 227,017 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,786,839 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 603 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,017 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them