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Precise interpolar phasing of abrupt climate change during the last ice age

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
twitter
79 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
178 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
355 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Precise interpolar phasing of abrupt climate change during the last ice age
Published in
Nature, April 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14401
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The last glacial period exhibited abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger climatic oscillations, evidence of which is preserved in a variety of Northern Hemisphere palaeoclimate archives. Ice cores show that Antarctica cooled during the warm phases of the Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle and vice versa, suggesting an interhemispheric redistribution of heat through a mechanism called the bipolar seesaw. Variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength are thought to have been important, but much uncertainty remains regarding the dynamics and trigger of these abrupt events. Key information is contained in the relative phasing of hemispheric climate variations, yet the large, poorly constrained difference between gas age and ice age and the relatively low resolution of methane records from Antarctic ice cores have so far precluded methane-based synchronization at the required sub-centennial precision. Here we use a recently drilled high-accumulation Antarctic ice core to show that, on average, abrupt Greenland warming leads the corresponding Antarctic cooling onset by 218 ± 92 years (2σ) for Dansgaard-Oeschger events, including the Bølling event; Greenland cooling leads the corresponding onset of Antarctic warming by 208 ± 96 years. Our results demonstrate a north-to-south directionality of the abrupt climatic signal, which is propagated to the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes by oceanic rather than atmospheric processes. The similar interpolar phasing of warming and cooling transitions suggests that the transfer time of the climatic signal is independent of the AMOC background state. Our findings confirm a central role for ocean circulation in the bipolar seesaw and provide clear criteria for assessing hypotheses and model simulations of Dansgaard-Oeschger dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 79 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 355 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Estonia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 340 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 97 27%
Researcher 69 19%
Student > Master 38 11%
Student > Bachelor 36 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 5%
Other 60 17%
Unknown 38 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 211 59%
Environmental Science 42 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 3%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Chemistry 5 1%
Other 24 7%
Unknown 56 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 163. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2020.
All research outputs
#137,759
of 17,455,239 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#10,660
of 79,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,050
of 236,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#317
of 1,023 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,455,239 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 89.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,023 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.