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Design and methods of the NiCK study: neurocognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of children and young adults with chronic kidney disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nephrology, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Design and methods of the NiCK study: neurocognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of children and young adults with chronic kidney disease
Published in
BMC Nephrology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12882-015-0061-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erum A Hartung, Nina Laney, Ji Young Kim, Rebecca L Ruebner, John A Detre, Hua-Shan Liu, Christos Davatzikos, Guray Erus, Jimit J Doshi, Robert T Schultz, John D Herrington, Abbas F Jawad, Divya G Moodalbail, Ruben C Gur, Allison M Port, Jerilynn Radcliffe, Stephen R Hooper, Susan L Furth

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease is strongly linked to neurocognitive deficits in adults and children, but the pathophysiologic processes leading to these deficits remain poorly understood. The NiCK study (Neurocognitive Assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Children and Young Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease) seeks to address critical gaps in our understanding of the biological basis for neurologic abnormalities in chronic kidney disease. In this report, we describe the objectives, design, and methods of the NiCK study. The NiCK Study is a cross-sectional cohort study in which neurocognitive and neuroimaging phenotyping is performed in children and young adults, aged 8 to 25 years, with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy controls. Assessments include (1) comprehensive neurocognitive testing (using traditional and computerized methods); (2) detailed clinical phenotyping; and (3) multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess brain structure (using T1-weighted MRI, T2-weighted MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging), functional connectivity (using functional MRI), and blood flow (using arterial spin labeled MRI). Primary analyses will examine group differences in neurocognitive testing and neuroimaging between subjects with chronic kidney disease and healthy controls. Mechanisms responsible for neurocognitive dysfunction resulting from kidney disease will be explored by examining associations between neurocognitive testing and regional changes in brain structure, functional connectivity, or blood flow. In addition, the neurologic impact of kidney disease comorbidities such as anemia and hypertension will be explored. We highlight aspects of our analytical approach that illustrate the challenges and opportunities posed by data of this scope. The NiCK study provides a unique opportunity to address key questions about the biological basis of neurocognitive deficits in chronic kidney disease. Understanding these mechanisms could have great public health impact by guiding screening strategies, delivery of health information, and targeted treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease and its related comorbidities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 3 6%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 30%
Psychology 11 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,332,630
of 5,085,441 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nephrology
#269
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,647
of 157,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nephrology
#19
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,085,441 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.