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Impact of lower strength alcohol labeling on consumption: A randomized controlled trial.

Overview of attention for article published in Health Psychology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 2,472)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of lower strength alcohol labeling on consumption: A randomized controlled trial.
Published in
Health Psychology, July 2018
DOI 10.1037/hea0000622
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milica Vasiljevic, Dominique-Laurent Couturier, Daniel Frings, Antony C. Moss, Ian P. Albery, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Labels indicating low/light versions of tobacco and foods are perceived as less harmful, which may encourage people to consume more. There is an absence of evidence concerning the impact on consumption of labeling alcohol products as lower in strength. The current study tests the hypothesis that labeling wine and beer as lower in alcohol increases their consumption. Weekly wine and beer drinkers (n = 264) sampled from a representative panel of the general population of England were randomized to one of three groups to taste test drinks in a bar-laboratory varying only in the label displayed; Group 1: verbal descriptor Super Low combined with 4% alcohol by volume (ABV) for wine/1% ABV for beer; Group 2: verbal descriptor Low combined with 8% ABV for wine/3% ABV for beer; Group 3: no verbal descriptors of strength (Regular). Primary outcome was total volume (ml) of drink consumed. The results supported the study hypothesis: the total amount of drink consumed increased as the label on the drink denoted successively lower alcohol strength, BLin = .71, p = .015, 95% CI [0.13, 1.30]. Group contrasts showed significant differences between those offered drinks labeled as Super Low (M = 213.77) compared with Regular (M = 176.85), B = 1.43, p = .019, 95% CI [0.24, 2.61]. There was no significant difference in amount consumed between those offered drinks labeled as Low compared with Regular. These results suggest that labeling drinks as lower in strength increases the amount consumed. Further studies are warranted to test for replication in non-laboratory settings and to estimate whether any effects are at a level with the potential to harm health. ISRCTN15530806. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 27%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Other 2 7%
Other 8 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 53%
Unspecified 6 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 159. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2019.
All research outputs
#92,907
of 13,801,769 outputs
Outputs from Health Psychology
#17
of 2,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,306
of 273,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Psychology
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,801,769 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,472 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,710 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.