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Yellow fever

Overview of attention for article published in Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, February 2018
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1 tweeter

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Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Yellow fever
Published in
Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, February 2018
DOI 10.1590/1806-9282.64.02.106
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcelo Nóbrega Litvoc, Christina Terra Gallafrio Novaes, Max Igor Banks Ferreira Lopes

Abstract

The yellow fever (YF) virus is a Flavivirus, transmitted by Haemagogus, Sabethes or Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in forest areas in Africa and Latin America leading to epizootics in monkeys that constitute the reservoir of the disease. There are two forms of YF: sylvatic, transmitted accidentally when approaching the forests, and urban, which can be perpetuated by Aedes aegypti. In Brazil, the last case of urban YF occurred in 1942. Since then, there has been an expansion of transmission areas from the North and Midwest regions to the South and Southeast. In 2017, the country faced an important outbreak of the disease mainly in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. In 2018, its reach extended from Minas Gerais toward São Paulo. Yellow fever has an incubation period of 3 to 6 days and sudden onset of symptoms with high fever, myalgia, headache, nausea/vomiting and increased transaminases. The disease ranges from asymptomatic to severe forms. The most serious forms occur in around 15% of those infected, with high lethality rates. These forms lead to renal, hepatic and neurological impairment, and bleeding episodes. Treatment of mild and moderate forms is symptomatic, while severe and malignant forms depend on intensive care. Prevention is achieved by administering the vaccine, which is an effective (immunogenicity at 90-98%) and safe (0.4 severe events per 100,000 doses) measure. In 2018, the first transplants in the world due to YF were performed. There is also an attempt to evaluate the use of active drugs against the virus in order to reduce disease severity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sri Lanka 1 <1%
Unknown 117 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 15%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 6%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 39 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 49 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,432,078
of 12,860,000 outputs
Outputs from Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
#351
of 467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#233,751
of 269,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,860,000 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 467 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.