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Strength training in soccer with a specific focus on highly trained players

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine - Open, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 212)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
223 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
293 Mendeley
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Title
Strength training in soccer with a specific focus on highly trained players
Published in
Sports Medicine - Open, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40798-015-0006-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

João R Silva, George P Nassis, Antonio Rebelo

Abstract

Data concerning the physical demands of soccer (e.g., activity pattern) suggest that a high level of performance requires well-developed neuromuscular function (NF). Proficient NF may be relevant to maintain and/or increase players' short- (intense periods of soccer-specific activity; accelerations, decelerations, and sprinting) and long-term performance during a match and throughout the season. This review examines the extent to which distinct modes of strength training improve soccer players' performance, as well as the effects of concurrent strength and endurance training on the physical capacity of players. A selection of studies was performed in two screening phases. The first phase consisted of identifying articles through a systematic search using relevant databases, including the US National Library of Medicine (PubMed), MEDLINE, and SportDiscus. Several permutations of keywords were utilized (e.g., soccer; strength; power; muscle function), along with the additional scanning of the reference lists of relevant manuscripts. Given the wide range of this review, additional researchers were included. The second phase involved applying six selection criteria to the articles. After the two selection phases, 24 manuscripts involving a total sample of 523 soccer players were considered. Our analysis suggests that professional players need to significantly increase their strength to obtain slight improvements in certain running-based actions (sprint and change of direction speed). Strength training induces greater performance improvements in jump actions than in running-based activities, and these achievements varied according to the motor task [e.g., greater improvements in acceleration (10 m) than in maximal speed (40 m) running movements and in non-squat jump (SJ) than in SSC-based actions (countermovement jump)]. With regard to the strength/power training methods used by soccer players, high-intensity resistance training seems to be more efficient than moderate-intensity resistance training (hypertrophic). From a training frequency perspective, two weekly sessions of strength training are sufficient to increase a player's force production and muscle power-based actions during pre-season, with one weekly session being adequate to avoid in-season detraining. Nevertheless, to further improve performance during the competitive period, training should incorporate a higher volume of soccer-specific power-based actions that target the neuromuscular system. Combined strength/power training programs involving different movement patterns and an increased focus on soccer-specific power-based actions are preferred over traditional resistance exercises, not only due to their superior efficiency but also due to their ecological value. Strength/power training programs should incorporate a significant number of exercises targeting the efficiency of stretch-shortening-cycle activities and soccer-specific strength-based actions. Manipulation of training surfaces could constitute an important training strategy (e.g., when players are returning from an injury). In addition, given the conditional concurrent nature of the sport, concurrent high-intensity strength and high-intensity endurance training modes (HIT) may enhance a player's overall performance capacity. Our analysis suggests that neuromuscular training improves both physiological and physical measures associated with the high-level performance of soccer players.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 223 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 293 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 285 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 69 24%
Student > Master 62 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 12%
Researcher 19 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 55 19%
Unknown 33 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 187 64%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 2%
Social Sciences 3 1%
Other 12 4%
Unknown 48 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 156. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2020.
All research outputs
#106,439
of 14,547,858 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine - Open
#4
of 212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,022
of 229,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine - Open
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,547,858 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 212 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,570 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them