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Built environment and active play among Washington DC metropolitan children: A protocol for a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Public Health, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Built environment and active play among Washington DC metropolitan children: A protocol for a cross-sectional study
Published in
Archives of Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13690-015-0070-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer D Roberts, Rashawn Ray, Amber D Biles, Brandon Knight, Brian E Saelens

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that children who participate in active play are more likely to be physically active, thereby improving long-term health outcomes. Many adult studies have also shown that neighborhood built environments can encourage or discourage routine physical activity. Limited evidence has demonstrated that children who reside in neighborhoods with a built environment that is more inviting to active play exhibit lower overweight and obesity rates as well as an overall better state of well-being. This Built Environment and Active Play (BEAP) Study aims to develop a neighborhood playability rating system in the Washington, DC (DMV) area. Similar to walkability scores, these playability scores will estimate how affable a neighborhood is to active play. The BEAP Study will attempt to provide a broad view of factors influencing the level and type of active play among children. Using a cross-sectional design, the BEAP Study will collect data using a mail questionnaire administered to the parents and/or guardians of 2000 children aged 7-12 years residing in select DMV areas in October of 2014. Questionnaire data, including information on active play, home and neighborhood characteristics, parental perceptions, and sociodemographic characteristics will be merged through a geographic information system (GIS) with objective built environment measures in the participants' neighborhoods. An ordered logit model will be used to regress an ordinal active play outcome on built environment exposure variables while adjusting for potential confounders. Upon the construction of the final model, predictor coefficients will be used as parameters in the scoring system to develop neighborhood playability scores. The BEAP Study intends to generate a neighborhood playability index by characterizing and quantifying children's active play using parent-reported physical activity data in children, GIS data and built environment measures in participant neighborhoods. The BEAP Study will improve our understanding of the built environment and childhood playability relationship while also contributing to the body of evidence-based built environment and physical activity research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Psychology 4 7%
Other 16 29%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2015.
All research outputs
#6,461,891
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Public Health
#195
of 347 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,441
of 224,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Public Health
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 347 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,389 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.