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Tracking multiple modes of endocrine activity in Australia's largest inland sewage treatment plant and effluent- receiving environment using a panel of in vitro bioassays

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, August 2015
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Title
Tracking multiple modes of endocrine activity in Australia's largest inland sewage treatment plant and effluent- receiving environment using a panel of in vitro bioassays
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, August 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.3051
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenna Roberts, Peter A. Bain, Anupama Kumar, Christopher Hepplewhite, David J. Ellis, Andrew G. Christy, Sara G. Beavis

Abstract

Estrogenicity of sewage effluents, and related ecotoxicological effects in effluent-receiving environments, has been widely reported over the last two decades. However, relatively little attention has been given to other endocrine pathways that may be similarly disrupted by a growing list of 'contaminants of concern'. Further, the Australian evidence base is limited compared to Europe and North America. During a low dilution period in summer, we investigated multiple endocrine potencies in Australia's largest inland sewage treatment plant (STP) and the Lower Molonglo/Upper Murrumbidgee effluent-receiving environment. This STP receives 900 L/s of mostly domestic wastewater from a population of 350 000, and contributes a high proportion of total flow in the lower catchment during dry periods. A panel of in vitro receptor-driven transactivation assays were used to detect (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic, (anti)progestagenic, glucocorticoid and peroxisome-proliferator activity at various stages of the sewage treatment process. Total estrogenic and (anti)androgenic potency was removed after primary and/or secondary treatment, however total removal efficiency for glucocorticoid potency was poorer (53-66%), and progestagenic potency was found to increase along the treatment train. Estrogenicity was detected in surface waters and bed sediments upstream and downstream of the effluent outfall, at maximum levels ten times lower than 'low-hazard' thresholds. Glucocorticoid and progestagenic activity were found to persist to 4 km downstream of the effluent outfall, suggesting future emphasis is needed on these EDC categories in effluent-receiving systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Master 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 14 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Engineering 3 9%
Chemistry 2 6%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2015.
All research outputs
#15,036,302
of 17,015,490 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#4,294
of 4,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,983
of 234,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#70
of 94 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 4,767 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.