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Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
241 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
6 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
419 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1174 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores
Published in
Science Advances, May 2015
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1400103
Pubmed ID
Authors

William J. Ripple, Thomas M. Newsome, Christopher Wolf, Rodolfo Dirzo, Kristoffer T. Everatt, Mauro Galetti, Matt W. Hayward, Graham I. H. Kerley, Taal Levi, Peter A. Lindsey, David W. Macdonald, Yadvinder Malhi, Luke E. Painter, Christopher J. Sandom, John Terborgh, Blaire Van Valkenburgh

Abstract

Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass ≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores are generally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-larger swaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 241 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 16 1%
United States 15 1%
United Kingdom 9 <1%
South Africa 4 <1%
Italy 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Other 14 1%
Unknown 1106 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 208 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 204 17%
Researcher 200 17%
Student > Bachelor 159 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 64 5%
Other 210 18%
Unknown 129 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 515 44%
Environmental Science 345 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 37 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 2%
Social Sciences 14 1%
Other 63 5%
Unknown 174 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 630. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2021.
All research outputs
#18,182
of 17,464,602 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#235
of 6,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230
of 235,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#4
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,464,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,844 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.