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Chapter 1 - The Regulation of Secondary Metabolism and Mutualism in the Insect Pathogenic Bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens

Overview of attention for article published in Advances in applied microbiology, September 2011
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

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Citations

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Title
Chapter 1 - The Regulation of Secondary Metabolism and Mutualism in the Insect Pathogenic Bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens
Published in
Advances in applied microbiology, September 2011
DOI 10.1016/b978-0-12-387048-3.00001-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joyce SA, Lango L, Clarke DJ

Abstract

Photorhabdus is a genus of insect-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria that also maintain a mutualistic interaction with nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. This complex life cycle, involving different interactions with different invertebrate hosts, coupled with the amenability of the system to laboratory culture has resulted in the development of Photorhabdus as a model system for studying bacterial-host interactions. Photorhabdus is predicted to have an extensive secondary metabolism with the genetic potential to produce >20 different small secondary metabolites. Therefore, this system also presents us with a unique opportunity to study the contribution of secondary metabolism to the environmental fitness of the producing organism in its natural habitat (i.e., the insect and/or the nematode). In vivo and in vitro studies have revealed that the vast majority of the genetic loci in Photorhabdus predicted to be involved in the production of secondary metabolites appear to be cryptic and, to date, although several have been characterized, only three compounds have been studied in any great detail: 3,5-dihydroxy-4-isopropylstilbene, the β-lactam antibiotic carbapenem, and an anthraquinone pigment. In this chapter, we describe how these compounds are made and the role (if any) that they have during the interactions between Photorhabdus and its invertebrate hosts. We will also outline recent work on the regulation of secondary metabolism in Photorhabdus and comment on how this has led to an increased understanding of mutualism in this bacterium.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 20%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 9%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 17 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2016.
All research outputs
#11,553,935
of 14,576,963 outputs
Outputs from Advances in applied microbiology
#125
of 167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,309
of 100,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in applied microbiology
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,576,963 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 167 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 100,275 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them