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Severity and duration of pain after colonoscopy and gastroscopy: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Nursing, May 2015
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Title
Severity and duration of pain after colonoscopy and gastroscopy: a cohort study
Published in
Journal of Clinical Nursing, May 2015
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12817
Pubmed ID
Authors

Penny Allen, Elissa Shaw, Anne Jong, Heidi Behrens, Isabelle Skinner

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the prevalence, severity, location and duration of pain post-colonoscopy, and to explore possible associations between pain, demographic variables and diagnostic findings. The study also sought to provide information to guide decision-making on CO2 insufflation. Colonoscopy with sedation is a common day surgery procedure in Australia. Attendance for colonoscopy is influenced by patient expectations, particularly about pain. Research on post-colonoscopy pain has focussed on pain experienced immediately post-procedure, with few studies investigating pain beyond 24 hours. Follow-up study using patient-completed Pain Numerical Rating Scales. Patients undergoing colonoscopy at a single hospital day surgery unit were invited to complete Pain Numerical Rating Scales (where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst possible pain) three times daily for three days post-colonoscopy. Among the 277 participants, 124 (45%) reported pain at any time during follow-up. Twenty-one (8%) participants experienced pain on each of the three days. Pain was most commonly experienced in the hypogastric and iliac regions. The severity of pain was low, with only 33 participants self-administering analgesics (paracetamol or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) during follow-up. Participants who had both colonoscopy and gastroscopy were not more likely to report pain overall. However, they were more likely to report pain on days 2 and 3 and were also more likely to take analgesics. Pain was not associated with procedure duration, abdominal pressurisation, removal of polyps, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease or the presence of benign or malignant lesions. This research indicates that fewer than half of the patients undergoing colonoscopy will experience post-procedure pain and that just over one in ten patients will require analgesics. Patients undergoing both gastroscopy and colonoscopy are more likely to experience pain for longer and require over-the-counter analgesics. The low prevalence of pain suggests that room air insufflation is an acceptable alternative to more expensive CO2 . The findings provide evidence for nurses and clinicians to advise patients about the likelihood of experiencing pain post-colonoscopy, and the characteristics of this pain. Nurses may reassure patients that pain is not more likely among patients diagnosed with colorectal disease or malignancy. Patients who have persistent pain for longer than 24 hours post-colonoscopy should be advised to seek medical care to investigate the cause of their pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 19 32%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 12%
Psychology 4 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Engineering 3 5%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2015.
All research outputs
#7,720,047
of 12,350,579 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Nursing
#2,168
of 3,162 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,753
of 230,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Nursing
#92
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,350,579 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,162 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,095 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.