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Dysbiotic drift: mental health, environmental grey space, and microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 264)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
35 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
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Title
Dysbiotic drift: mental health, environmental grey space, and microbiota
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40101-015-0061-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan C Logan

Abstract

Advances in research concerning the mental health implications of dietary patterns and select nutrients have been remarkable. At the same time, there have been rapid increases in the understanding of the ways in which non-pathogenic microbes can potentially influence many aspects of human health, including those in the mental realm. Discussions of nutrition and microbiota are often overlapping. A separate, yet equally connected, avenue of research is that related to natural (for example, green space) and built environments, and in particular, how they are connected to human cognition and behaviors. It is argued here that a 'disparity of microbiota' might be expected among the socioeconomically disadvantaged, those whom face more profound environmental forces. Many of the environmental forces pushing against the vulnerable are at the neighborhood level. Matching the developing microbiome research with existing environmental justice research suggests that grey space may promote dysbiosis by default. In addition, the influence of Westernized lifestyle patterns, and the marketing forces that drive unhealthy behaviors in deprived communities, might allow dysbiosis to be the norm rather than the exception in those already at high risk of depression, subthreshold (subsyndromal) conditions, and subpar mental health. If microbiota are indeed at the intersection of nutrition, environmental health, and lifestyle medicine (as these avenues pertain to mental health), then perhaps the rapidly evolving gut-brain-microbiota conversation needs to operate through a wider lens. In contrast to the more narrowly defined psychobiotic, the term eco-psychotropic is introduced.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 281 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 16%
Researcher 36 13%
Student > Bachelor 35 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 8%
Other 57 20%
Unknown 55 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 8%
Psychology 21 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 6%
Other 72 25%
Unknown 68 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2021.
All research outputs
#1,155,122
of 22,489,683 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#27
of 264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,566
of 246,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,489,683 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 264 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,819 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them