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High prevalence of dhfr and dhps molecular markers in Plasmodium falciparum in pregnant women of Nchelenge district, Northern Zambia

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2015
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Title
High prevalence of dhfr and dhps molecular markers in Plasmodium falciparum in pregnant women of Nchelenge district, Northern Zambia
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0676-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mwiche NP Siame, Sungano Mharakurwa, James Chipeta, Philip Thuma, Charles Michelo

Abstract

Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is the recommended drug for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) in most African countries, including Zambia. However, malaria is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women despite reports of greater than 50% of women taking at least two doses of SP in IPTp. Studies have shown that resistance to SP is associated with mutations in the dhfr and dhps gene of Plasmodium falciparum. This study examined the prevalence of dhfr and dhps polymorphisms in P. falciparum found in pregnant women of Nchelenge district. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 in Nchelenge, a holoendemic area with malaria prevalence estimated at 50% throughout the year. Three rural health centres were randomly selected and a census survey carried out at each health centre. A questionnaire was administered and malaria testing done using RDT and microscopy, with collection of a dried blood spot. A chelex extraction was done to extract parasite DNA from dried blood spots followed by nested PCR andenzyme restriction digestion. Of the enrolled participants (n = 375), the median age of the women was 25. The prevalence of malaria by PCR was 22%. The PCR positive samples examined (n = 72) showed a high prevalence of dhfr triple (Asn-108 + Arg-59 + Ile-59) mutant (68%) and dhps double (Gly -437 + Glu-540) mutant (21%). The quintuple haplotype was found in 17% with 2 samples with an additional Gly-581mutation. In addition 6% mutations at Val-16 were found and none found at Thr-108 respectively, these both confer resistance to cycloguanil. Multivariate analysis showed that there was an association between malaria and women aged 30-34 years old p < 0.05(AOR: 0.36) at 95% CI. This study showed a high number of mutations in the dhfr and dhps genes. The high malaria endemicity in the general population of this area may have contributed to the high prevalence of resistant parasites in pregnant women, suggesting a need to examine the efficacy of SP given that it is the only approved drug for IPTp in Zambia.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 57 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 24%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 2 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 17%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,215,985
of 5,067,967 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,748
of 2,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,348
of 158,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#105
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,067,967 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,018 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.